The Warfighter: A Novel of the Second Korean War (The Aviator: Stories of Future Wars Book 2) by Craig DiLouie Review

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. All opinions are my own.

After peace has settled over the Pacific in the aftermath of the Taiwan War, Navy fighter pilot Jack Knapp finds himself standing between a US City and nuclear destruction as he explains to the world the true cost of war and heroism in author Craig DiLouie’s “The Warfighter: A Novel of the Second Korean War”, the second book in The Aviator: Stories of Future Wars series.

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The Synopsis

Peace has returned to the Pacific after the Taiwan War, but it doesn’t last. The Korean peninsula erupts in fire and blood, drawing America into a fresh conflict that sees use of some of the world’s deadliest weapons.

In the aftermath, Navy fighter pilot Jack Knapp tells a news reporter about his experiences fighting the Korean People’s Army (KPA) and how he helped prevent a nuclear attack that could have destroyed an American city.

As the media simultaneously cheers and questions the war, Jack sets out to explain the truth of its heroism and horror—so that all might understand war’s true cost.

The Review

With a brilliant balance of character growth that readers can identify with and haunting insights into war, especially a look into future warfare, author Craig DiLouie has crafted a brilliant follow-up to his beloved novel The Aviator. Following his political prisoner trial, protagonist Jack Knapp returns to the line of duty, finding his struggle to not only retrain and fit in with his crew but normal civilian life in general after spending so long being tortured and imprisoned. The in-depth look into the mental and physical nature of his return was an engaging aspect of his character growth and helped elevate the overall narrative.

The drama and sheer terror that comes from the actual act of war on soldiers and civilians was brilliantly captured in this novel. Examining the political nature of wars from a non-political character’s POV was an inspired choice, highlighting who the real “winners” and “losers” are in a war, where power and money take precedence over family and loved ones. The futuristic setting and the character’s more personal interactions really gave the novel the entertainment and theme that this story needed to feel balanced.

The Verdict

A heart-wrenching, memorable, and engaging novel, author Craig DiLouie’s “The Warfighter” is a must-read of 2021, and a perfect sequel. The balance of narration from the author in the present and the memories of this horrific war from his past really made this feel like a soldier’s experience of warfare in the future. Readers will be enthralled with this narrative of a real soldier’s experiences in the chaos and struggle of war, and how little we understand when we haven’t had to face the choices they have. If you haven’t yet, be sure to grab your copy today!

Rating: 10/10

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About the Author

Craig DiLouie is an author of popular thriller, apocalyptic/horror, and sci-fi/fantasy fiction.

In hundreds of reviews, Craig’s novels have been praised for their strong characters, action, and gritty realism. Each book promises an exciting experience with people you’ll care about in a world that feels real.

These works have been nominated for major literary awards such as the Bram Stoker Award and Audie Award, translated into multiple languages, and optioned for film. He is a member of the HWA, International Thriller Writers, and IFWA.

http://craigdilouie.com/

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