Interview with Author Julia L.F. Goldstein

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. At what point did you decide to pursue writing about your field of study?

I started my career as a process development engineer in the semiconductor manufacturing industry, designing better ways to connect computer chips to circuit boards. As an engineer, I gravitated toward writing the articles for publication in trade magazines and the reports for projects. I began my writing career with Advanced Packaging Magazine, a publication in which I had published contributed articles. My current business, JLFG Communications, focuses on writing technical marketing content for corporate websites, but I still occasionally write articles for trade and business magazines. It’s nice to keep a toe in journalism and not only write anonymous content.

2) What inspired you to write your book?

My initial inspiration was a desire to shift my client base toward companies involved in sustainable manufacturing and renewable energy. I figured that writing a book on the topic would give me credibility that would help me get a foot in the door. Clients I’ve been working with for years will trust me with projects outside my proven fields of expertise, but potential clients often want to see experience writing for their specific industry.

As I delved into the research, my fascination with the subject matter and interactions with the enthusiastic business professionals I interviewed inspired me to continue. I knew that I needed to get this book out into the world.

3) What do you hope readers will take away from your book above all else?

I want readers to understand that the challenges of reducing waste in manufacturing are complex, but many smart business leaders are developing creative solutions and progress is being made. We shouldn’t be complacent, but neither should we be discouraged. I want readers to commit to at least one action at work or at home that allows them to be part of the solution.

4) What drew you into this particular field of study?

I’ve been fascinated by engineered materials ever since I took an introductory materials science course in college, but I didn’t always consider the environmental impact of all the amazing materials that engineers were inventing. In recent years, I’ve thought more about these issues and the responsibility of manufacturers to their employees, customers, and the communities in which they operate. The more I learned about companies embracing the triple bottom line—profit, people, planet—the more I became convinced that I should write a book focused on the materials aspect of sustainability.

5) What is the number one thing you would recommend for a manufacturing company just starting out in their business?

Fledgling manufacturing companies contemplating the shift from prototypes to volume production face many hurdles. I urge them to consider the environmental footprint of their manufacturing process when evaluating their entire supply chain. If they want to be eco-friendly, that needs to extend to every component or ingredient in their products, every vendor they choose, where they manufacture their products, and how they ship products to customers. Making smart decisions up front can save money in the long run and build trust with customers.

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

I’ve gotten traction with both Facebook and LinkedIn. I made my book launch an event on Facebook and invited all my local Seattle-area friends. My multiple posts about the book got the attention of many friends in the San Francisco Bay Area, where I lived for 20 years, and many of them are now on my mailing list. When my LinkedIn contacts shared my post about the book launch, it expanded my reach to hundreds of people I’ve never met. In the long run, I believe that LinkedIn will be more helpful in reaching a business audience.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Join a writing group that meets in person, in addition to participating in online groups. Writing is a solitary activity, but just being in the company of other writers can inspire you to achieve your goals. For nonfiction authors, the Nonfiction Authors Association has a wealth of information on its website, including links to its weekly teleseminars, plus chapters in many cities that hold monthly meetings. Whether you’re wondering what type of editing your book will need or trying to decide between submitting a proposal to agents or self-publishing, experienced authors can help point you in the right direction.

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

In the short term, I’m focused on marketing Material Value. Simply writing a book that people want to read isn’t enough. It’s an author’s responsibility to let potential readers know that the book exists. I am, however, gathering ideas for my next book. It will also address materials and sustainability but focused on the textile and fashion industries. A surprisingly large number of companies are producing fabrics made from recycled plastic water bottles.

About the Author:

Julia L F Goldstein holds a PhD in materials science and started her career as an engineer before migrating to journalism in 2001. She now writes white papers and other technical marketing content for companies manufacturing a wide variety of products. Julia is active in her local writing community and leads the Seattle chapter of the Nonfiction Authors Association. When she’s not writing, she enjoys playing flute and piccolo and participating in triathlons.

Connect with Julia:

 juliagoldsteinauthor.com

twitter.com/jlfgoldstein

linkedin.com/in/juliagoldstein

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Material Value: More Sustainable, Less Wasteful Manufacturing of Everything from Cell Phones to Cleaning Products by Julia L.F. Goldstein Review

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. All opinions are my own.

An in-depth study of how materials like plastic and metals are not only made, but how businesses can use new knowledge to extract these materials without any damage being done to human life and the environment as a whole take center stage in author Julia Goldstein’s book, “Material Value: More Sustainable, Less Wasteful Manufacturing of Everything from Cell Phones to Cleaning Products”. Here is the synopsis.

The Synopsis 

Have you wondered why gold is so expensive or why so little plastic packaging is recycled? This highly readable book with a unique perspective on environmental sustainability answers these questions and more.

Readers will learn:

How metals and plastics are made and what happens when they are recycled The challenges that manufacturers face when trying to make their facilities and products less toxic and less wasteful How manufacturers can extract the value of materials while doing less damage to human health and the environment The role of individuals, agencies, and governments in improving the use and reuse of materials How regulations can stifle or promote innovation How smart companies are embracing the triple bottom line–profit, people, planet–to yield creative solutions that make manufacturing safer and less wasteful Why some big corporations painted as evildoers deserve a second look. How reporting standards are making it easier to get a full picture of a company’s environmental footprint The author explains concepts clearly and concisely through compelling examples and personal stories. Hear the journeys of:

A business owner recycling scrap from airplane manufacturing A former geologist running a chain of donut shops Two entrepreneurs committed to improving e-waste processing An executive promoting social and environmental responsibility at a major electronics company A chemist developing safer cleaning products Consultants helping businesses embrace practices that save resources and money Other business professionals devoted to making the world a better place Concerned citizens with or without a background in manufacturing or business will find surprising answers to the questions facing companies as they work toward making better use and reuse of materials. Readers will come away with a new awareness of the steps they can take to help the business world succeed in making manufacturing more sustainable and less wasteful.

The Review

Not only is this nonfiction title informative and descriptive, but relates the knowledge of this specific field in a relatable way that is not difficult to understand, which is something that truly stands out from other textbook style novels. Using her expertise in the field and study of materials science, the author uses a mixture of personal anecdote, first hand accounts and detailed examples to drive the points she is making home.

From challenging the differences between companies who care about the environment and those who only worry about the perceived image of “sustainability”, to theories and visions of a specific plastic that in theory could capture carbon emissions, and in that same theory envisioning a field of trees made of this material in an effort to reduce the carbon in our environment, the author explores the ins and outs of the field in great detail, and gives both business owners, others in the field and interested readers a chance to really see what it takes to make a more sustainable and less wasteful manufacturing society as a whole. 

The Verdict

This is a must read for anyone interested in materials science and the more sustainable way to maintain a business in manufacturing. It’s through, intelligent and relatable all at once, and gives new and fresh insights into how to make our world safer yet retain a high end manufacturing business all at once. From studying how materials are made and the different elements of the periodic table that are required for said materials, to the safe practices that could be implemented to keep people and the environment safe, to mining operations of material and how various countries and their specific working conditions due to war, this novel explores it all. If you haven’t yet, be sure to grab your copy of “Material Value: More Sustainable, Less Wasteful Manufacturing of Everything from Cell Phones to Cleaning Products” by Julia Goldstein today.

Rating: 10/10

About the Author

Julia L F Goldstein holds a PhD in materials science and started her career as an engineer before migrating to journalism in 2001. She now writes white papers and other technical marketing content for companies manufacturing a wide variety of products. Julia is active in her local writing community and leads the Seattle chapter of the Nonfiction Authors Association. When she’s not writing, she enjoys playing flute and piccolo and participating in triathlons.

www.jlfgoldstein.com