Smashwords July Summer/Winter Book Promotion: 50% Off And Free eBooks!

Hello there!

I hope everyone is having a fantastic summer thus far! As I continue preparing for the upcoming release of novella #2 in my YA series Nightmare Academy, I thought it would be a great time to start sharing my books with you all. That’s why I’m excited to share that my books I Was An Evil Teenager: Remastered and Welcome to Nightmare Academy are taking part in Smashwords annual Summer/Winter promotion! Throughout the entire month of July, I Was An Evil Teenager: Remastered is going to be 50% off (that’s $1.50 for an entire novel), and Welcome to Nightmare Academy will be completely free! Yes, the first entry in the series is now free for the entire month. So click the link down below and get both a marked down, scary horror novel about a teenage killer and get a free copy of a highly reviewed and engaging upcoming YA series. If you enjoy these stories then I would love for you to leave a review on any site you are able to and also preorder your copy of Freshman Hunt: A Nightmare Academy Novella today! Thanks everyone, and enjoy your summer!

IMG_4959

https://bit.ly/2IKOtiA

Advertisements

Interview with Author Stephan Morse

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

Writing came about from a failed project in the 5th grade. It was a bad fiction where I turned into a dragon and burned some other child in class I hated for reasons that were probably silly. We ended up meeting Ursula Le Quin (I believe, this was decades ago well before I’d read her books) as part of a school event. Between those two events, I’d always had an interest in writing novels. It only grew as I went through Junior High and High School and read anything fantasy related in three libraries. It took some time before I dared to write my own novels and release them to the public.

2) What inspired you to write your book?

 I tend to read a dozen or so books as part of my recharge process. over a few month span.  The Fiasco came about from a superhero kick, where I read nearly anything my Kindle could find from the genre. During this reading spree I’d been editing prior works, prepping some for release on eReaders, and so on. I wanted to try something new – a way to see a new story in an older setting. Comics, movies, and even a few old audio novels all played their part in inspiring The Fiasco but I feel like I managed something new(ish), which is my first goal when writing.

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

It’s less about theme and more about exploring the rest of a world that others may ignore. As an example, my favorite characters in the Marvel Universe were the ones that fell between the cracks – specifically the Morlocks. They weren’t good enough to fit on a team, they weren’t powerful enough to be villains or anything else, and generally ugly enough that everyone gave them dirty looks. I loved these people because they were living a real life. They had day jobs and failure to fit in with normal crowds. They were the most developed characters because their plight started well before mainstream heroes started addressing life behind the mask.That sunk in, misfits among misfits.

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

The Fiasco’s superhero sort of ideas were a weird mix of every other mainstream series – since I’d spent so much time reading superhero novels. That being said, probably Marvel’s universe had the biggest impact on a desire to write in the genre. It’s simply been around so long that nearly everything else shares some inspiration from their works. Heck, I grew up reading comics (and compulsively sorting them). But I couldn’t let my work be a carbon copy of the classic coming of age and learning to use powers for great justice sort of tale. It couldn’t be about stopping the big bad from ruining the world in their ill thought out megalomaniac plot. It became about the captives left behind, the person who’s forced to be in all these powered events. The man who’s simply tired of being in the super powered world because he’s never the actual hero or a catharsis seeking vigilante/villain.

5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

There’s a lot of stuff I’d ask my characters – and constantly are things I’m asking them. I could pick Ted, who’s the first book’s semi villain and sort of mentor. His role is complicated because people are rarely one dimensional. He wants to get back at those who ruined his life and took away his daughter. He wants to make his wife see that there are some forces which are unstoppable – that losing their kid wasn’t his fault, but he also wants Adam to answer for his reactive role in everything that goes on. But because I know all those things, asking him his motivation seems weird.So, any question I ask has to be really out of the way.

Like, what’s the weirdest thing you’ve ever eaten and where was it? That’s a question I may never have an answer to. So now, I really want to know.

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

Facebook, hands down. I have my little author page and hang out in a few groups that focus on the same genre as my main series. It’s fun interacting with the readers who ping me when topics come up. I try to avoid self promotion and generally only pop by when someone messages me about a post – but Facebook lets me see what people think about the work, and that’s always an awe inspiring moment.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Finish a book. Don’t restart it 10 times. Don’t edit it until you’re drowning and hate yourself. Finish it. Quality aside, knowing that you have finished a book means a ton. It was the greatest thing I ever did.

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

More books, more writing. But real life and the day job take precedence over putting together novels. However, now that I’ve started – I don’t think I’ll ever be able to stop. There will be two more books for The Fiasco eventually, bringing the series to a close. There’ll be some virtual reality based books along with western fantasy mashups. Ideas tend to occur faster than my fingers can type.

The Fiasco In News by Stephan Morse Review

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. All opinions are my own.

An incredible twist on the superhero genre plays out in author Stephan Morse’s novel The Fiasco In News. Exploring the life of one young man who gains the unfortunate superpower of drawing disasters to himself, this genre mixture of dark comedy, horror, science fiction, fantasy and satire lights up the pages of this book like no other book before it. Here’s the synopsis:

When you’ve seen as many catastrophes as I have, “disaster” becomes a relative term. But when disaster hits, feel free to do what I do—hang your head while waiting for the tight-wearing crowd to arrive. That only works if your super power is the same one I have though. I’m an immortal walking magnet for superpowered problems. 

This new guy, Ted—a fake part-time villain who’s in it for the ratings and excitement—wants me to be a field correspondent for his news blog, and his offer sounds good. If I can’t beat ’em, expose ’em. The problem is he has no idea what my daily life is like. 

No one really does—but they’ll learn.

When I read this novel, I honestly couldn’t believe it wasn’t a television show already. Reading this was like reading the script to a show on Netflix that mixed the whacky horror of Ash vs. The Evil Dead, the larger than life superhero antic of The Flash and the adult drama of a Marvel Netflix show. Not only was this book packed with the incredible superhero action that one comes to expect from the genre, but we got a comic look at the way superpowers impact everyday people, and also the tragedy of those same interactions.

The character of Adam Millard felt very relatable if you can believe that. Despite his overwhelming power, the feeling of hopelessness in the face of overwhelming odds and the struggle to overcome your circumstances that cannot be changed felt like something I could personally identify with, while the sarcasm and humor he displayed in the face of these otherwise incredible encounters made me feel like I was watching a comedy on HBO instead of reading a book.

Overall I loved this story. It was one of the most original and unique stories I’ve read this year. The imagery used in this story made me picture the novel as if it were an actual comic book. I could almost see the twisted worlds Adam was forced to visit in this story popping off of the page, and the relationship between himself and the supporting cast made this an incredible story to behold. I can only hope we get more adventures of Adam Millard and I hope one day we can get this incredible series turned into a show, for it’s one of those stories that is both original and easily translatable onto another entertainment medium. If you haven’t yet be sure to pick up your copies of author Stephan Morse’s novel The Fiasco In News today!

Rating: 10/10

FiascoAB-2400x2400A.jpg

https://www.amazon.com/Fiasco-News-Stephan-Morse-ebook/dp/B072JG7BR4/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1525666353&sr=1-1-spons&keywords=The+Fiasco+In+News&psc=1

Interview with Author Caspar Vega

Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

I’ve been writing in one form or another since I was a kid. My first attempts were dirty rap songs that I wrote on A4 paper and illustrated – I must have been around eight years old then. My mother might still have them stored somewhere. Some angsty teenage poetry followed, then a few short stories that I thought were decent at the time.

I started taking it seriously when I turned 18 in February 2009. That’s when I wrote the first pages of what would eventually become my debut novella The Eclectic Prince that I self-published in 2012. It took me a long time to finish because I didn’t have any writing habits developed but in my mind, I knew I was pursuing something.

What inspired you to write your book?

Different influences inspired the vignettes in Southern Dust. Gretchen’s story is more of an introduction to the Governor. The Governor’s part explores similar themes I had already covered in my earlier novel Hayfoot but something still felt unfinished there and I took it a bit further with Nightingale’s story.

Roger Conaway’s story is a mash-up of several things. Captain America is one of my favorite heroes and I always liked the idea of a super soldier experiment. This was exacerbated when I watched The Guest for the third time – the best movie of 2014 by far.

I was also watching Game of Thrones for the first time a few months before I started outlining and Theon Greyjoy’s arc was so tragic and disturbing. Also Nightmare Alley with Tyrone Power. It made me want to tell a story where we see the complete rise and fall of a character. Someone who becomes truly monstrous and unrecognizable by the end of it.

Dominic White is about one third myself, one third Oberyn Martell – one of the greatest characters to ever be on TV – and one third something else.

Plotting this book was a lot of fun because I felt like I was writing a prologue and three separate mini-books. I think they tie together neatly in the end.

What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

None whatsoever – I only hope they’re entertained.

What drew you into this particular genre?

I think I bend several genres together in this one but as far as a black magic adventure story, this is my version of a Dennis Wheatley book. Now to replicate his sales numbers.

If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

Dominic’s the most like me but he’s very anti-social, I don’t think he’d agree to a meeting.

What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

I used to be on Gab which gave me a few interesting acquaintances but I’ve gotten rid of everything except Instagram now. Something about being able to send out condensed little messages on a big platform brings out the worst in some people, myself included.

What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Force yourself to write until it comes to you naturally. I spent three years on my first book – a 20,000 word novella – because I only wrote when I felt “inspired” which is a copout. If you have a rough outline, set yourself some simple goals and get writing. I’m very proud of my first book and I wouldn’t change a thing about it but I was definitely making excuses and stalling for a while.

What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

I’m working on a new novella now that’s a parody of the modern thriller genre entitled The Gone Girl On the Train Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest. I’m also working on a few TV pilots because let’s face it, that’s where the real money is for writers. Wish me luck.

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/princeofpulp/.

Southern Dust by Caspar Vega Review

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. All opinions are my own.

An incredible genre fusion of a book comes together in author Caspar Vega’s novel Southern Dust. A story filled with monsters, civil war and tales of revenge all set in a post-Trump era, this story delves into the differences between people in our divided world, and how it fuels the actions taken on a large scale. Here’s the synopsis:

A diesel-fueled, black magic powered, vampire-creating Southern extravaganza!

Gretchen Walker: A Southern belle living an idyllic life in the newly independent Alabama; worrying about the upcoming cotillion, and hoping more than anything to find a dapper young suitor from a good family. Might she end up getting more than she bargained for?

The Governor: The enigmatic leader responsible for achieving the aforementioned independence.

Roger Conaway: An enforcer trying to make a clean break. When his boss tells him a friend’s daughter has gone missing, can Roger find the girl and get out of the game while he still has a shard of innocence left?

Dominic White: An obsessive Hornbuster overcome with grief; recovering from a nervous breakdown, and actively seeking revenge for his murdered sister.

Discover their interconnected stories in this spiderweb of love, politics, guilt, and revenge.

This book was a fast yet engaging read. It reminded me a little of the connectivity of a good Dean Koontz novel, with a wonderful blend of genre fusions like horror, science fiction and historical fiction all rolled into one. The characters were interesting to read about as they each dealt with a troubling background, and led into the horrors that brought them all together. Exploring a world in which people rose up and declared independence for individual states was interesting as a plot point, as the current political nature of the United States in particular is volatile and easily could find itself in a time of great turmoil.

The author did an amazing job drawing the reader in, creating beautiful scenery that played out wonderfully through each page of the book. The ease in which the genres blended with the overall story made this feel like a more real story than ever before, and the story itself flowed smoothly.

Overall I loved this story. The writing was very down to earth while blending in these larger than life and fantastic story elements. It was a fascinating read that drew me in immediately from the story’s first page. If you haven’t yet be sure to pick up your copies of Southern Dust by Caspar Vega today!

Rating: 10/10

AMAZON: http://amzn.to/2puTGq3

GOODREADS: http://bit.ly/2sh5jBW

Face your Demons (Tainted Blood #1) by Nina Hobson Review

I received a copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. All opinions are my own.

A brutal horror story of a group of children terrorized by a monster straight out of humanity’s worst nightmares comes to life in author Nina Hobson’s novel “Face Your Demons”. Part of the Tainted Blood series, this book is filled with fast paced action, gruesome horror and a cliff-hanger ending you won’t be expecting. Here’s the synopsis:

Librarian’s note: This is an Alternate Cover Edition for ASIN: B0089PT018.

Jennifer’s young life has never been better. She has it all: family, friends and fun. That is until her terminally ill cousin comes to live with them setting in motion a horrific turn of events unlike anyone in the town of Cleveland has ever seen.

Oh yeah…and did she mention her best friend’s sister has a massive crush on her?

 

NinaHobsonBookslogo

This was one of the more unique horror tales I’ve read in recent years. The story reminded me of a more fast paced version of Stephen King’s IT, with a string of child murders plaguing a town and a group of pre-teen children facing this threat alone. The adults are all acting strange, and have dark secrets of their own. The horror of this tale is what really sells the story. The in your face scares and gory deaths solidify the horror heavy tale, while the character development between protagonist Jennifer and her friends helps bring a much needed human element to this supernatural tale.

The only criticism I would have is that while fast paced, this story does have moments of show vs. tell writing. I’d advise a slightly lengthier approach to garner that show quality storytelling that allows the reader to visualize the monsters for themselves. While the formatting itself did make some of the pages jumbled, I did receive an early copy of this book and therefore the formatting has most likely been improved since then.

Overall this was a very enjoyable horror tale. Filled with suspense, intense action horror scenes and a deepening plot that screams for more stories to be told, this was a fantastic first entry into the horror series. If you haven’t picked up your copies of Face Your Demons (Tainted Blood #1) by Nina Hobson, then do so today!

Rating: 8/10

 

 

Interview with Author Israfel Sivad

1)     Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

For as long as I can remember, I’ve always written. The first story I ever wrote was a sequel to Return of the Jedi after I saw that film as a little kid. I didn’t want the story to end. So, I kept it going. After my parents divorced, I started writing song lyrics every night to help me fall asleep. That’s when I first discovered how cathartic writing could be. I based the structures on all the lyrics I read on the liner notes of my cassette tapes. But it wasn’t until I graduated from high school, when I realized I was sick of playing in punk rock bands that I started taking my writing very seriously. I realized writing was how I communicated with the world, and I wanted to do that directly. I didn’t want my audience to have a mediated experience. I’ve modified that stance since then, but I’ve never not considered myself a writer since then.

2)     What inspired you to write your book?

The Adversary’s Good News was inspired by seeing a copy of Dante’s Inferno one morning. A roommate of mine had left it on the kitchen table. I’d recently finished my first novel, and I was looking for a new project. I took one glance at that book, and I realized, I’ve had visions of the afterlife. I want to write that story.

3)     What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

I want readers of The Adversary’s Good News to think about life and love and the value of both.

4)     What drew you into this particular genre?

With The Adversary’s Good News, I didn’t start with any particular genre in mind. As the story went on, I realized more and more that it was a kind of horror story. Since that was where the writing had naturally taken me, I decided to embrace it. I went back and reread Stephen King, Clive Barker and Dean Koontz for inspiration (in addition to the classics I was reading to help me construct a literary version of hell – Dante’s Inferno and Milton’s Paradise Lost). Once it was done, and I took a closer look at it, I decided it was its own kind of genre, which I refer to as “Literary Horror.”

5)     If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

If I could sit down with any character in my book, I’d sit down with Evius. As the impetus for the entire cavorting story, I’d want to know what makes him tick, why he acts the way he does. Why does he lead Christian on this journey through the afterlife, and is there any reason to his rhymes? Also, I’d like to know who he actually is. What’s his name? Where does he come from? Who is he, really?

6)     What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

Facebook and Instagram have definitely been the most instrumental. Each site has its own values, and its own abilities. But I’ve heard back from specific readers on both sites who have discovered my books there.

7)     What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Don’t give up. Find a story you believe in. Write it and promote it. It’s worth getting your voice out there. It’s what “we” do.

8)     What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

More writing. Always. I have a new collection of poetry scheduled for release this summer. It’s called We Are the Underground, and I’m very excited about this collection. It includes my “Zodiac” cycle, which contains one poem for every sign in both the Western and Chinese zodiac systems; although, true to form for me, which one is which is not always the easiest to spot. That’s what I think makes the cycle so interesting, trying to figure out which poem represents you and your sign. Poems from this collection have recently appeared in The Stray Branch and Badlands Literary Journal. If this collection sounds like something you’re interested in, I urge you to join my mailing list at: https://tinyletter.com/IsrafelSivad. As a mailing list member, you’ll know precisely when We Are the Underground is released, and I’ll send you a link to purchase. Also, when you join, you’ll get a free copy of my selected poems in the member’s only collection Lunar Surfaces.

Author Bio:

Israfel Sivad is originally from Whittier, CA. He is the founder of Ursprung Collective, which has been referred to as “fantastic brain food” on ReverbNation. His first novel, Crossroads Blues, has been compared to the work of Fyodor Dostoevsky (Palmetto Review).​​ His second novel, The Adversary’s Good News, was a finalist for the 2016 Chanticleer Paranormal Book Award. His stories and poems have appeared in the Santa Fe Literary ReviewThe Stray Branch and Badlands Literary Journal.

 

Websites:
 
Israfel Sivad: www.IsrafelSivad.com
Mailing List/FREE Book: https://tinyletter.com/IsrafelSivad
Amazon Bookstore:  amazon.com/author/israfel-sivad