Tag Archives: email interview

Interview with Author Luanne Castle

Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

Sometimes it seems as if I was always a writer. When I was a baby, I used to love magazines and would rip out each page and wad it up. Maybe I was being a critic, but I like to think that I loved the paper, ink, and pictures—not to mention the sound of the crumpling paper. I have always loved books, reading, and writing. However, I don’t think I was ready to begin to write in earnest until I was in my late twenties, when I had enough life experiences.

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What inspired you to write your book?

Rooted and Winged came about from the experiences I had throughout the writing of the poems and the memories that came to light during that period. The book took about five years to write as I began it after my chapbook Kin Types was published. Then, after COVID surfaced, I finished the final poems. These pandemic poems can be found in Section IV. Death, loss, aging, and terminal illness inhabit the final part of the book along with the lonely surreal feel of living in the first few months of a pandemic. “Hearing Aids” describes how my mother bought her first hearing aids during these scary months when we were both trapped within our homes almost two thousand miles apart, feeling isolated yet united:

“She pours tea there / and I pour mine here. Our spouts speak the same.” 

What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

I hope readers draw what they personally glean from the poems, drawing upon their own perspectives and experiences. Writing poetry is a discovery process for the poet. I don’t know what I am going to learn until I complete a poem. From this collection, I found that the images of flight are meaningful to me as both a spiritual site and as a source of great power. But without roots to tie me to earth and its human and animal inhabitants, I would lose the balance that guides the power.

What drew you into this particular genre?

I have loved poetry since I was a child. I still love to read poetry, but I also enjoy memoirs and mysteries. I tend to write in short bursts of time regularly, which is very conducive to writing poetry. To write a novel, I would need large blocks of time. Also, I love the imagery and succinct quality of poetry.

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What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

Definitely my blog, Writersite.org. I started it ten years ago and have made wonderful friends through blogging. My readers are so supportive of my writing and me personally. Facebook is an excellent way to share my writing with friends from different parts of my life and with other writers. I like Twitter because I can keep up with what is going on with other writers. Instagram is fun, but I use it more for my art journaling since it is a visual social media.

What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Read, read, read in several genres, especially in the genre you want to write in. And take every in-person or online workshop or writing class that you can. Many free or low-cost ones become available, so watch for them. Don’t publish too soon. Even if you are planning a novel or full-length memoir, start with smaller projects and submit stories and poems to literary journals. Finally, don’t publish a book that hasn’t been adequately edited. 

What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

I just completed my memoir in flash nonfiction “scraps.” Fittingly, it’s called Scrap: Salvaging a Family. I’ve also been assembling a chapbook of poems based on Little Red Riding Hood stories.

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About the Poet

Luanne Castle’s Kin Types (Finishing Line Press), a chapbook of poetry and flash nonfiction, was a finalist for the 2018 Eric Hoffer Award.  Her first poetry collection, Doll God, winner of the 2015 New Mexico-Arizona Book Award, was published by Aldrich Press. A Pushcart and Best of the Net nominee, she studied at the University of California, Riverside (PhD); Western Michigan University (MFA); and Stanford University.  Her writing has appeared in Copper Nickel, TAB, The American Journal of Poetry, Glass: A Journal of Poetry, Verse Daily, Saranac Review, Lunch Ticket, River Teeth, and other journals. An avid blogger, she can be found at luannecastle.com.  She divides her time between California and Arizona, where she shares land with a bobcat. Her heart belongs to her rescue cats.

Luanne blogs at Writer Site and The Family Kalamazoo.

https://www.luannecastle.com/

Interview with Author Vincent Meis

Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

I was born in the middle of the twentieth century and grew up in a middle-sized city in the middle of Illinois in the middle of the country, a middle child in a middle-class family. But there was nothing middle about my hopes and dreams. I knew I was different from my siblings and other kids in the neighborhood, but I wasn’t sure what that was. I started writing plays for my younger sisters to perform in when I was ten. In high school I won a short story contest sponsored by the local newspaper. In college I wrote poetry. In the following years, I started several novels, wrote short stories and more poetry, and when I embraced my sexuality in my mid-twenties, writing became a way to express my new gay awareness. After college I began working as an English as a Second Language teacher both in the States and abroad. It was through this career I discovered travel and had the chance to live in and/or travel to many countries. My first published works were travel articles, mostly for gay publications about the experience of traveling as a gay man in other lands. After thirty-five years of teaching, I decided to take an early retirement and seriously pursue my writing, digging out a lot of my old writing and polishing it for publication. Since then, I have published seven novels and a book of short stories as well as having several of my short stories included in anthologies.

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What inspired you to write your book?

One of my fans, after reading my novel Four Calling Burds, expressed an interest in knowing what happened next in the lives of the four Burd siblings. She asked me if I planned to write a sequel and I gave my standard answer, which was that I didn’t write sequels. It was up to the reader to imagine the rest of the story. At that point, I had published five novels and had almost finished writing the sixth without even thinking of doing a sequel. But she did have a point. I sometimes wondered what had happened to the Burds siblings myself. I struggled with the concept of how much I should write for my readers and how much for myself.

The book in question was a contemporary novel set around the year 2017, and at the end of the book, all the characters were living in the San Francisco Bay Area. To write a novel set in 2019-2020 they would have aged only a few years. I started thinking about characters from two of my other novels, who would also be living in the Bay Area and only aged a few years. Wouldn’t it be fun if some of the characters from the other novels met and interacted with each other and the four Burd siblings? And thus, the novel was born. In one case, a character from one novel meets and falls in love with the character from another. A woman from my novel, Tio Jorge, has become an immigration lawyer and helps the Mexican boyfriend of the Burd sibling, AJ. At one point, there is birthday party, which brings all the major and many of the minor characters from the three novels together. They meet, socialize, flirt, and at the end, all band together to search for a teenager who has gone missing from the party.

What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

I have a quote on my email page from Edward Albee that says, “All art should be useful. If it’s merely decorative, it’s a waste of time.” To me, that means my writing should have a strong message, educate if you will, as well as entertain. I have been accused of being “too political,” but I want readers to learn about other cultures and ethnicities. My writing has themes of diversity, racial equality, immigrant rights, an all the issues the LGBTQ+ community deals with.  I have always enjoyed writing fictional characters who are very different from me in age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, and culture. It is a challenge that thrills me. I have written many Latinx characters and though I speak Spanish, I am very much a product of the North American Midwest. I have written Black characters though my genealogy tells me I am 99.7% of Northern European background. I write lots of heterosexual characters though all indications are that I am homosexual. I have written a transitioning FTM character though I identify as cisgender. I have heard other writers express that they would never presume to write a character of a different race/ethnicity. A former editor gave a novel I wrote with lots of Black characters to a Black sensitivity reader without telling my background. Apparently, I passed, and she wanted to proceed with the book. I don’t plan to stop writing diverse characters, but I always keep asking myself if I am being authentic.

What drew you into this particular genre?

I write what I like to read: literary fiction and contemporary fiction. I grew up reading American and British literary fiction, particularly early twentieth century writers. Then I discovered literary fiction written by gay authors such as James Baldwin, Alan Hollinghurst, Michael Cunningham, and others. I have never been drawn to genre fiction though in recent years I have read a few wonderful books that focus on gay characters in the genres of science fiction, romance, fantasy, horror, etc. Currently, I would say my writing is contemporary LGBTQ+ fiction with a literary bent. I’ve never been comfortable with the tag “gay fiction” though I’m marginally more satisfied with the updated label of LGBTQ+ fiction. Gay fiction tends to conjure up the image of romance or a coming out story, and yes, my books have elements of those scenarios. I certainly do not shy away from fully gay characters and ultimately my mission is to present homosexual men dealing with the world around them in both the ways which are unique to us as well as the ways we are the same. In many cases the men I write are challenged in a foreign setting where they must cope with how another culture sees them not only as a gay man, but also a foreigner. I do, however, like presenting an array of characters of all sexual orientations and identities.

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If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

A character named M appears in two of my novels. In Four Calling Burds, she is trying to deal with the strong maleness inside her and first starts thinking about transition. In First Born Sons, M goes through the process of transitioning FTM. A writer always hopes to get a character right, but particularly if they fall into a marginalized group. I would like to ask him if I presented him realistically. Did I do justice to the incredible process of transition? Did I adequately portray the pain and joy of becoming the person he wanted to be?

What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

I try not to have regrets, but I do wish I had focused more on my writing in those early years when I clearly had the calling. I didn’t trust it and kept abandoning projects, easily distracted by other things going on in my life. In the eighties, I had some good feedback on what would eventually become my first novel. Instead of diving all in, I put it aside for twenty years. By the time I got to publishing that novel, I was already past my prime and I wasn’t patient about finding a publisher and decided to self-publish. I rushed it. Never, ever rush your first novel. Work like hell to get it as perfect as you can. Work like hell to get a publisher. Believe in yourself. I’m currently reading the latest work by someone who is an icon in the gay writing community because of his first novel, which was a marvel, particularly for its time. He has ridden the wave of success for forty years. I find his latest work mediocre and almost unreadable, and yet he has reviews from all the major publications and is on the New York Times Reader’s Choice list. The reviews from actual readers, many of them probably unaware of his past glory, reflect the impression I had of the book. The point I’m making is to give that first effort the absolute best you can, and then go back and rewrite ten more times. An early hit can carry you through during more difficult times. I feel like I have gotten better over the course of my writing, but I can’t go back and have a redo of my debut novel.

What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

I’m very excited about the future of my writing. Early next year my first Young Adult novel will come out from my current publisher, Colton’s Terrible Wonderful Year. One of the characters from First Born Sons, Colton, is a fourteen-year-old mixed-race son of a gay couple. He is entering the “danger zone” for young men of color in the United States. I extracted his story from the novel, added a lot of new details about his life and wrote the story in his first-person voice. It has a lot of funny parts, but also tearful moments as he and his gay dads struggle with what’s happening in the world. I’m also about three-quarters done with the first draft of a sequel to The Mayor of Oak Street, but forty years later. We learn what happens to Nathan after getting together with the man of his dreams at the end of The Mayor. Now a man in his early sixties, he is often lost in his memories of his loves and losses, the traumas and joys that peppered his life. He is given one last chance at love. Will he take it?

“All art should be useful. If it’s merely decorative, it’s a waste of time.” – Edward Albee

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About the Author

Vincent Meis grew up in Decatur, Illinois and graduated from Tulane University in New Orleans.

He has worked as an English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher in the San Francisco Bay Area, Spain, Saudi Arabia and Mexico, publishing many academic articles in his field as well as articles about teaching ESL overseas. He has also traveled extensively in Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, the Caribbean, and Central and South American. He is fluent in Spanish. As result of his travels and time abroad he published a number of pieces, mostly travel articles, but also a few poems and book reviews, in publications such as, The Advocate, LA Weekly, In Style, and Our World in the 1980’s and 90’s. His travels have inspired four novels, all set at least partially in foreign countries: Eddie’s Desert Rose (2011), Tio Jorge (2012), and Down in Cuba (2013) and Deluge (2016). Tio Jorge received a Rainbow Award in the category of Bisexual Fiction in 2012. Down in Cuba received two Rainbow Awards in 2013. Deluge won a Rainbow Award in 2016. Recently his stories have been published in several collections, including WITH:New Gay Fiction, Best Gay Erotica Vol 1and Best Gay Erotica Vol 4. In December 2019, his fifth novel Four Calling Burds will be published. In 2021, he has published two books with NineStar Press, The Mayor of Oak Street, a novel, and Far from Home, a collection of short stories.

https://www.vincentmeis.com/

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0B6T5WWHK/ref=x_gr_w_glide_sin?caller=Goodreads&callerLink=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.goodreads.com%2Fbook%2Fshow%2F61680454-first-born-sons%3Fac%3D1%26from_search%3Dtrue%26qid%3DsDwIiz2aFA%26rank%3D4&tag=x_gr_w_glide_sin-20

Interview with Author The Raven’s Doctor

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

– I got into writing because of my fascination with the stories woven by the many animes and fantasy stories I’ve seen throughout my life. That with the added bonus that people said I had a bit of a talent for writing kind of collimated into me trying to throw my hat into the ring. The only thing I will say about my life is that it can all be summed up in one word, and that word is persistence.

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2) What inspired you to write your book?

– I sight two light novels and one anime that jump started this little story of mine. The two light novels were The Rising of the Shield Hero and Overlord and the anime that was a major help to me was Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood. But the funny thing is that I had six chapters already written before I even watched Fullmetal Alchemist.

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

– I have two themes that I want my readers to really take from my book, the first thing is that family is what you make it. The other one was that fate can never bind it, but I’ll put more emphasis on that theme in later books.

 4) What drew you into this particular genre?

– I have a unique love for both horror and isekai (trapped in another world) fantasy stories.

5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

– I would sit alongside Malcom and ask him how it felt getting his head cut off. I would ask because I always wanted the power to detach and reattach body parts at a whim.

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

– I’m going to be honest, I’ve tried a good many writer sites and have found little to no success when it comes to readership.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

– Find the best editor your money can buy, trust me it goes a long way with helping your book.

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

– I don’t know what the future may hold. I’ll be honest, it doesn’t look too hopeful but I won’t let that deter me. I will make sure that later in life that more books will be released. And hopefully an anime will come out as well.

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About the Author

The Raven’s Doctor likens himself to a weaver; his computer is the loom, and the words are the threads. Every day, without exception, the Doctor weaves his tale throughout. Additionally, he will examine his work closely to make sure there are no visible nicks or crevices. He aims to make the reader feel as though they are a fly on the wall witnessing the action take place in real time. What more could The Raven’s Doctor want for? He will also weave his book such that it may continue beyond his death for future generations.

Interview with Author Yasmine Maher 

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

I think I’ve always been a storyteller, even before I learned how to write. My parents used to keep cassette tapes of the six-year-old me narrating stories I made up with imaginary characters and colorful worlds. During middle school, I started experimenting with writing, video creation, and drawing anime mainly because I had so many stories to tell. Though I didn’t create anything serious until much later in life, it all put me on the right track.

Growing up with social anxiety, I had a lot of trouble expressing myself. I have never really been an eloquent speaker, but writing gave me an opportunity to put my thoughts and feelings into words and helped me become more confident.

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2) What inspired you to write your book?

Honestly, I wrote the first draft of Echo so long ago that I can’t remember how it all started. But I do know that I’ve always been passionate about magic and superheroes. At that time, most female superheroes I knew were “too cool,” if I may. I couldn’t relate to them, and I wanted to write about a hero that was just…ordinary. A clumsy, sometimes naive character who’s always trying to do her best despite her own insecurities. That was how Echo was born. 

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

Everyone has a choice. In the battle against evil, the hardest part is to fight the demons inside. Whether it was Echo, Doyle, Ebba, or any of the characters, it was always up to them to choose redemption, even when it wasn’t the obvious choice and when it wasn’t easy.

There’s evil and good in all of us, and we get to choose which side will win. 

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

I’ve been a fan of witches and witchcraft since I was a child watching Sabrina The Teenage Witch on the Disney channel. So, my first serious book had to be a fantasy. 

5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

If I could, I’d sit down with Vanna, drink tea, and ask her about life in general. What she has learned in her long life and what she has read in her books. Vanna has always been the one who didn’t say much, yet she thought a lot and had surprising opinions about everything.  

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6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

It’s a bit too early to judge that since I’m still starting, and my book isn’t even out yet. Like many authors, social media is a great challenge for me; however, I’m more comfortable using Twitter than FB or Instagram, and many people know me from there.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Keep writing. It’s the only way to get better. Ask for professional feedback if you can (and as soon as you can). And stay strong. Writing is not for the faint of heart, and the path to authorship is full of rewrites, rejections, and redirections. 

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

Yes, I’m very excited about moving on to my new books. I’ve already plotted the planned the first two. They’re going to be different from Echo, and I hope they’ll live up to my readers’ expectations.

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About the Author

Yasmine Maher is the author of Echo: The Curse of the Blackwood Witches and Director of Fables and Facts Publishing. As a passionate wordsmith and an active member of the Twitter writing community, Yasmine loves to weave captivating tales that inspire her readers with whimsical adventures, magic, and larger-than-life characters.

https://yasminemaher.com/

Interview with Author Philippa Jabouin 

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

This is my first book and my initial intention was to publish in French, which is my first language. However, I stumbled upon a writing contest for micro fiction and French was not one of the languages in which you could submit your work. I ended up submitting 2 stories but I had almost fifty that I was not using. That’s when I decided I would publish them and that’s how my collection ended up being in English. 

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2) What inspired you to write your book?

Short stories have always been my favorite type of fiction. Two of my favorite authors, Françoise Sagan and Chimamanda Adichie, write with so much emotional intensity. I was inspired by their work and wondered, what triggers intense emotional reactions for me? This is what motivated me to write the stories in my book. 

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

I hope they appreciate the deep inner workings of the human mind. Things are not always what they seem at the surface, and it is almost impossible to read other people’s minds. When you are not in someone else’s shoes, you just never know what is going on for them.

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

I enjoy novels in general and I think short stories simply give me the impression that I am getting even more out of an author. Great short stories leave you with a sense of awe and wonder because the length leaves you wanting more. I would love to create that feeling in my readers. 

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5) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

I don’t use much social media. Maybe I should. I use the old fashion social networks, i.e. word of mouth!

6) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

The author Hala Alyan states that she allotted 30 minutes a day to her creative writing as she was working on her doctoral thesis. I decided to try it out and soon 30 minutes a day became 1 or 2 hours. That is how I got my book written and published in a year. 

7) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

I would like to keep writing and publishing short stories for the moment. I feel I need the practice before I devote time to a full novel. My next collection of short stories will be in French!

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About the Author

Philippa c. Jabouin has authored many articles and short stories under her name and as a ghostwriter. As a recovering ex-lawyer, she now spends her time writing as a freelance journalist, editor, and consultant. This is her first published collection of short stories. She lives in the Ottawa/Gatineau region of Canada.

https://a.co/cp41DxM

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/short-shorts-on-family-and-other-issues-philippa-c-jabouin/1140828868

Interview with Author Colin Guest

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

While on a palace contract in Brunei for the Sultan, I started an online writing course. At first, all went well with both my tutor and I pleased with how things were going. However, when my tutor was changed, nothing was the same. In one lesson, I had to write the basis of some true-life stories. This I did, but my tutor did not believe they were true. As a result, I stopped the course.

2) What inspired you to write your book?

After I retired from working for fourteen years on mainly high-class projects spread over three continents, I wrote Follow in the Tigerman’s Footsteps, a memoir of this time. It shows that there is more to life than a boring 9-5 job.

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

By thinking positive when things get tough, it is possible to get back in the driving seat of life.

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

I write in several genres, both fiction and non-fiction. As well as memoirs, I write thrillers and romance stories.

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5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

I would ask Jeff Stone, the main character in two of my thrillers, For the Greater Good and Desperation Rules the Day, how he manages to survive in dangerous situations. It would help give me a better understanding about the characters I write about.

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

I guess that would be Facebook. I use this for posting about my writing and replying to others in the various groups I belong to.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Never give up. If you find yourself stuck while writing a story, take a break. Go out and take a walk if you are able, or pick up a book and read. Later, when you feel more relaxed, return to your writing.

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

I am presently completing It Happened in Barcelona, another romantic novel, as well as working on Accidental Death, a short thriller. I am also part way writing a film script based on A Dangerous Love Affair, another of my published romantic novels.

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About the Author

Colin Guest is an author with eleven books published in various genres. His latest book, An Unforgettable Cruise is a romantic novel. He has also written two film scripts based on his thrillers, For the Greater Good, and Desperation Rules the Day. Colin lives in Istanbul, Turkey with his wife Gulden and their cat Bella.

Check out, https://colinguestauthor.com

Interview with Author Joseph Schiller 

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

I first fell in love with prose in a creative writing elective class in the 7th grade.  The teacher (wish I could remember her name so I could give a proper shout-out) really helped me develop my literary voice and confidence. I’ve been writing fiction ever since.  Earlier on I tended more toward short stories.  This novel is my first attempt at long-format.

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2) What inspired you to write your book?

I’ve always been fascinated by the mythologies of early cultures and the way in which these cultures personified their beliefs and spirituality.  Angels of Death of caught my imagination for a while. For this particular story, I actually began with the imagery of a specific scene of an angel of death observing the passing of a mortal, which became Chapter 2 of the book. From that point, the rest of the story developed out.

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

I don’t have a specific message or theme I want readers to take away.  It would mean more to me that they simply enjoyed the story.  Sometimes that is enough, to just enjoy a book.

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

Everyone has their own unique inner creative voice.  Mine just happens to gravitate toward the imaginary.  This is the case both with my prose and my art.  I’ve always been “in the clouds”.  There’s already enough reality in my life.  I’d much rather dream.

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5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

I really only have one main character in my story, Azrael. My other characters play more minor roles. I wouldn’t want to ask him anything so much as I would like to “see” or experience things from his perspective as an angel of death.  Sometimes I feel that our physical frames are so limiting.

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

I haven’t found much help from social media.  This doesn’t mean that I do not use social media platforms.  It just means that I have not seen a direct correlation between social media, and why people are buying my books. Most of my witnessable success in getting books into people’s hands has come from hitting the pavement, or, in other words, getting out into the community with book signings.  I’ve been busy at comicons, farmer’s markets, bookstores, comic books stores, and breweries doing signings.  I also spent weeks contacting a couple of thousand indie bookstores worldwide directly by email. Now I’m in 17 bookstores.  One thing I’ve picked up on social media is that it is saturated, so I chose to get old school.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Write for yourself first and foremost.  You are the only person that needs to be satisfied by your story.  That same perspective should, therefore, also guide you when working with an editor. Use a freelance work site such as Upwork or Fiverr to find an editor, graphic designer, and some to do your book layout.  There are plenty of highly qualified people that can help you for a fraction of what the traditional companies will charge.

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

I am currently working on another fiction novel based on the ancient Greek mathematician and esoteric figure, Pythagoras.  I’m still conceptually working out the plotline, so much too early to provide more, but what I can say is the premise will be connected with some of the mystery surrounding Pythagoras.

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About the Author

Joseph A. Schiller is a high school social studies teacher in Houston, TX, where he lives with his wife and three sons.  Upon the Arrival of Dawn is his debut novel.

FB: facebook.com/UpontheArrivalofDawn

URL: josephschiller.weebly.com/authorship

Interview with Author Louise Ambrosio

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing? 

I was an English major. I was very reflective, I had a lot of strong feelings and I often wrote them down in a diary but never ventured into writing a novel. I was so busy creating space for people to manufacture their art, as either a manager or a producer, etc.

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2) What inspired you to write your book?

I stopped running and had the opportunity to look back and saw the immense chapters in my life and the stories I needed to tell. 

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

Hopefully, every individual will strive for freedom, freedom is not a political instrument, freedom is internal in man’s soul. Using truth, the real truth of one’s consciousness in coming to terms with the ghost/reservoir main our life where one can achieve true freedom. When freedom is achieved one becomes limitless. Truth is a very hard pill to swallow for most of us but without truth, we have no freedom. 

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

Truth. You cannot write this genre unless you have a basis of truth. Though it is fiction, most fiction is based on reality.

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5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

I would ask Gail why she made such a destructive choice in attaining a goal that she rightfully should have answers for but she wound up hampering or destroying close to 400 actors’ careers.

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

None and I am not a big fan of social media. It is a necessity for communicating.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

I would tell a young writer to zero in on elements of your life and talk about them but remember the equation of truth and freedom. 

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

A round trip on the Queen Mary to England, then renting a car and retracing my steps for 3 months in Europe, when I return from Europe I am then getting into my Jeep with Buddy going cross country retracing my steps in America on those wonderful trips I had. I am in the outline stage of writing a second book called “Reflections on a reservoir man.” Looking back, observing on my final journey. Also, the release of our new feature film “How Dark They Prey” on various platforms including Amazon Prime Video September 15th, 2022.

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Author Bio: 

Louis J. Ambrosio ran one of the most nurturing bi-coastal talent agencies in Los Angeles and New York. He started his career as a theatrical producer, running two major regional theaters for eight seasons. Ambrosio also distinguished himself as an award-winning film producer and novelist throughout his impressive career.

Book Bio: 

Everywhere Michael turns he sees a Reservoir Man. Michael’s endless trials of survival include sexual assault, The Vietnam War, an arrest in Spain, Hollywood scandal, the AIDS outbreak, 9/11, and beyond. If only Michael could find the one thing he values most, his freedom. Michael’s coming-of-age is tarnished by many but the courage to live his truth may just keep Michael one step ahead…or will he succumb to the embraces of a Reservoir Man?

A Reservoir Man on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09ZCYB8PG?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860

Louis J. Ambrosio IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1780076/?ref_=nv_sr_1?ref_=nv_sr_1

Interview with Author Steve Malik Swayne 

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself? How did you get into writing?

I am Steve Malik Swayne. I was born in Ogden, Utah and raised in Salt Lake City, UT and Las Vegas, NV. I became fascinated with words in elementary school, where I began writing short stories and poems. This eventually led to me writing music and fictional novels.

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2) What inspired you to write your book?

Traitor was inspired by actual events. Traitor gave me the chance to express how I felt during my first few years of incarceration on a poetically creative level. The story was a release for me – the transformation of darkness into light, if you will.

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

In this specific piece, I would like for the reader to recognize the in-depth expression of what can dwell inside of each one of us when driven or pushed by betrayal. Secondly, I would like the reader to be dazzled by poetry and comparison to life and recognize we all have some kind of monster inside of us, rather it be negative or positive. Finally, I would like the readers to enjoy the various plots, twists, and craftiness of mental perception that Traitor delivers.

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

I am a complex thinker. Psychology was one of my favorite classes in college, not to mention, I am a major fan of thriller and suspense. I honestly put myself to the test with this one; I wanted to see if I truly had an understanding of what it is to create suspenseful dissimulation in the context of an urban thriller.

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5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

This is a difficult one, I mean, I am essentially the creator of their thoughts. So, there isn’t an answer they’d provide that I wouldn’t know. I guess if anyone, I would sit down with Xavier. Many times throughout the book, Xavier vowed he would never go back to prison. I would ask Xavier if he was nervous, worried, or concerned he could possibly be found connected to the downfall of his former friend, Tyson, causing him to go back to prison.

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

I would have to say Facebook thus far, although we have barely begun adventuring into our social media campaigns.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Just let the ideas flow. What begins as a simple thought may very well snowball into something monumental. As long as you believe in yourself, there is nothing you can’t accomplish, for creativity has no bounds.

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

I have three new projects that I have recently finished, all in different genres written from an urban perspective, delivering a unique message within each of them. I believe it’s invaluable to be able to deliver a relevant message through artful composure while still entertaining people. My ultimate goal is to bring my works to life on the big screen so that I may furnish people with entertainment on a broader platform.

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About the Author 

What’s up everybody! I am Steve Malik Swayne. I was born in Ogden, Utah and raised in Salt Lake City / Las Vegas, NV. I became fascinated with words in elementary school where I began writing short stories and poems which eventually led to me writing music. After years of pursing a music career, I began running the streets, headed down the wrong path eventually leading to my incarceration. While incarcerated, (a father of three) I decided I wouldn’t become a statistic. I enrolled in college classes where I obtained two associate degrees, one in Liberal Arts and the other in General Business Administration. Still passionate about writing, I began writing fictional novels, calling home to my wife, where she would record my writings, then take the hours of recordings and type them into her laptop. From there, we pursued publication and now those publications are being introduced to the world.

Social Media:

Instagram @stevemalikswayne_theauthor

Facebook @SteveMalikeSwayne

Twitter @Malik_theAuthor

Website traitorthenovel.com

Available on Amazon & Barnes&Noble