Interview with Author George Bachman

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

Writing started out as an extension of reading for me, continuing the same activity. I’ve been doing it for as long as I could write my name, even if it took a long time for the scribbles to mean something.

2) What inspired you to write your book?

My interests in fin de siecle England, when social attitudes among the aristocracy were changing as wealthy Americans penetrated their ranks, and the occultism practiced during that period.

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

How both good and bad people can be driven to do horrible things through no fault of their own, because of social pressures in no way designed to inflict the pain that they do.

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

My love of fantasy novels I grew up reading, in particular the Alice books (the best in the genre), John Crowley’s great Little, Big, Mervyn Peake’s Gormenghast books, Peter Straub’s underappreciated Shadowland, Mark Helprin’s Winter’s Tale and Swan Lake trilogy, Hope Mirrlees’s Lud-in-the-Mist, and many others.

5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

I would ask my lead character Christine if she believes she could ever earn Allie’s forgiveness.

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

Facebook. It’s the easiest way to reach like-minded readers and to keep them engaged.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Read, read, read. Read the current market, read the classics, absorb as much as you can.

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

I’m just finishing another historical fantasy, this one centered on Renaissance Europe.

@OfficialBachman
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Interview with Poet Robin Williams

1) Tell us a little about yourself. How did you get into writing?
I got into writing a month or two after I had planned to end my life, but I started to really write after I lost a friend to suicide. It was my way of coping.
2) What inspired you to write Forest Floor?
Forest Floor was first inspired by my Wildlife class. It was intended to be written for bonus points, but I instead found it complicated to write about nature in my style. So, I went along and just added poetry while keeping the title.
3) What themes do you hope or think are important for readers to take away from your poetry?
I hope readers take away the message that everything will be okay. Maybe not today, or tomorrow, or even a week from now, but it will be. I’m a survivor and I still struggle, and it’s okay to struggle.
4) What drew you into poetry in particular as a writing genre?
I used to write stories but found myself adding so much description that it took away the liking of my readers. When I came across poetry, I instantly knew that was what I wanted to write. I never believed I was good at writing stories, but poetry was the one thing I found my hope in, and I stuck with it.
5) If you could sit and talk with any writer or poet, who would it be and what would you ask them?
One of my favorite poets is Shelby Mcleroy, aka @slm_poems on Instagram. I would sit down with her and just ask her, How? How did she survive and how does she write so bloody well?
6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?
I believe Instagram has really helped build my readership. It’s much easier to reach people and to find people who really love my work. 
7) What advice would you give to any aspiring writers or authors out there?
I always say write from your heart. Put the raw emotions down onto paper and just let it all flow. If you do that, you have already become one of the best writers ever. 
8) What’s next for you? Any writing projects in the works?
 I have planned to reach out to a publisher after I graduate and to have them publish my longer, completed work Dear Nobody. As of right now, though, I am writing another collection called Salt and Sugar. 
Links:
• Instagram.com/tears.of.porcelain

Interview with Author Faye Hall

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

My name is Faye Hall and I am an Australian Historical Romance author.  My books are set in North Queensland, Australia during the 19th century.  I got into writing as a young child when my parents encouraged me to write down the stories I was forever telling them.  When I reached high school my senior English teacher told me I would never be good enough to make it as a writer.  It gave me the incentive to send my first manuscript to a publisher just to prove him wrong.  I’ve been working as an author ever since.
2) What inspired you to write your book?

My latest book, Indulgence & Temperance, is book number 2 in the Sins of the Virtuous series.  I have always wanted to write a book about the seven deadly sins, but it is a subject that has been done to death.  So I decided to incorporate heavenly virtues into each book as well, kind of like a good vs evil and using the characters to explain each sin and virtue.  Indulgence & Temperance takes the reader on a journey of Hellfire clubs, kidnapping, laudanum addiction and a passion driven love affair that is threatened to be ripped apart.
3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

I want readers to take piece of Australian history with them.  As far as Romance novels go, Australia is still very much a new setting.  I want to show readers my country has just as much of a passionate history as every other.
4) What drew you into this particular genre?

My love of history is what started it, but as I traveled through my teenage years I realized as much as I loved the suspense in my writing, I wanted more.  I wanted to create that ‘happily ever after’ that you read about in fairy tales.
5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

It would be Beth Meridian from Indulgence & Temperance.  I would want to ask her just exactly what she got up to when she worked in that Hellfire club.
6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

It would have to be Goodreads or Instagram – I end up chatting to quite a few people on there.  
7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

To not give up and to not be afraid to let yourself grow as a writer.
8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

More writing!  I’m almost finished book 3 from the series, and I’m onto the second draft of book 4.

Author Bio:

Come on a journey with me through 19th century North Queensland, Australian and explore the passions and hardships of unique characters.
There is corruption, deceit and murder, as well as cattle rustlers, slave traders and hell fire clubs. Explore townships of Jarvisfield and Inkerman, as well as Ravenswood and Bowen. One book even incorporates my great grandmothers cattle station ‘Inkerman Downs Station’.

As well as an author, I am also the most spoilt wife in the world, and a very contented mother.
Come and discover all the passion and drama of North Queensland history with me

Book Blurb:

Indulgence and Temperance by Faye Hall

 

Would you abandon the woman you love for your own indulgence?

 

Beth Meridian has returned home, hoping to leave her sordid past behind her and settle into a quiet life. When her childhood friend, Hannah Raeburn, offers her a place to stay, Beth knows it won’t be long until she runs into Hannah’s brother, Daniel. What she doesn’t expect is for him to reignite feelings deep in her heart, reminding her of the kiss they shared before she left town.

 

Daniel Raeburn’s past is scandalous, his sinful indulgences allowing him more wealth than he could ever need. Still, he wants more, and his gluttonous appetite for wealth and women leads him to buy into a partnership at the local hellfire club.

 

When Hannah goes missing, Beth and Daniel follow her trail through the Australian outback. Witnessing the womanizer Daniel is, Beth flees on a cattle train headed north. Desperate to explain his actions, Daniel follows her.

 

Arriving in the small town of Jarvisfield, Daniel is shocked to learn that Beth is now the owner of the largest cattle company in the area. He’s even more shocked to discover that the preacher controlling the town, and stealing from the townspeople, is his once business partner William Maxon. He’s convinced this man is also responsible for his sister’s disappearance. When he learns William has Beth picked out as his next victim, Daniel knows he must do whatever it takes to make her listen to the truth. But she has no interest in hearing anything he has to say.

 

Faced with losing the two women he loves, Daniel is forced to choose between their freedom and the possessions and wealth he has hoarded over the years. But even if he gives it all up, he still might lose everything.

 

Content Warning: contains sex, strong language, and some violence

 

 

Genre(s): Historical Romance

 

IndulgenceAndTemperance_Large.jpg

You can learn more about the author at her social media links here:

Links

Buy links

http://beachwalkpress.com/faye-hall/

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00DPIMSMW

https://itunes.apple.com/us/author/faye-hall/id1104960880?mt=11

https://www.kobo.com/au/en/search?query=Faye%20Hall&fcsearchfield=Author

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/%22Faye%20Hall%22?Ntk=P_key_Contributor_List&Ns=P_Sales_Rank&Ntx=mode+matchall

 

social media links

website https://www.faye-hall.com

blog http://www.faye-hall.info

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/Faye-Hall/174774709247649

https://www.facebook.com/faye.hall.3363?ref=tn_tnmn

Twitter https://twitter.com/FayeHall79

Goodreads http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6882637.Faye_Hall

Tumblr http://fayehallauthor.tumblr.com/

Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/fayehall79/

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/fayehallauthor/

Flipagram http://flipagram.com/fayehall79

Youtube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoS8vLrlO0XZT80xTuJnrkA/videos

 

 

Interview with Author Gwendolyn Kiste

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

 

Like a lot of authors, I’ve been writing in one form or another for most of my life. When I was very young, I started putting together little stories about anthropomorphic animals (a la The Church Mice books, if anyone remembers that series). I even illustrated my tales—very badly, of course, since I can’t draw at all. From there, I kept writing and eventually expanded to plays and screenplays through high school and college before circling back to my first love of fiction writing. In between, I explored a ton of other fields too: psychology, filmmaking, fashion design, teaching, nonprofit management, event promotion, travel blogging. I always like to challenge myself, so at the very least, I’ve rarely had a boring moment.    

 

2) What inspired you to write your book?

 

Since I was a kid, I’ve loved folklore and urban legends. As corny and on-the-nose as it may sound, I remember when the movie Urban Legend came out back in the 1990s, and how excited I was to see it. Spoiler: it’s not necessarily a great movie, but it was a great starting place for me when I was young and wanted to learn more about these strange modern myths we tell each other. The next Christmas, my parents got me an entire encyclopedia about urban legends, and after that, it became something of an obsession for me.

It wasn’t until a little over a year ago when my husband and I were discussing folklore that I realized how often the name Mary comes up in these tales. We went through and listed as many as we could think of, and I was shocked at how prolific that name really is. I hadn’t explored too much about urban legends in my writing up until that point, and I figured spinning a tale about these characters—who they are and how they got that name—would be a perfect place to start.  

 

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

 

I had so many ideas and themes in mind when I first started writing the book, but perhaps the biggest one for me was the notion of family and how sometimes the people closest to us are not our biological relatives but instead those we happen to find along the way. The Marys cobble together a family in their decrepit haunted house, and this bond is key to getting them through what’s to come.

Also, the power of resistance, of fighting back, even when the odds might seem insurmountable, was incredibly important to me with this story. The world can be so cruel, especially to those who are different, and I wanted to tell a tale about characters who are fighting to be heard despite a force trying hard to drown them out. In everyday life, I’m often hopeful to a fault, so I tend to believe that even in the worst times, all is not lost, which is certainly a major theme in Pretty Marys.  

 Pretty Marys All in a Row.jpeg

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

 

Horror has always been part of my life—literally, my entire life. My dad was very happily reading me Edgar Allan Poe while my mom was still pregnant. Horror in my family goes back even further than that too; my grandfather was a big Poe fan, and he shared that love of all things macabre with my father, who then of course passed it on to me. Growing up, there was always a Hammer movie on the TV or a book of horror short stories on the dining room table. I was reading Poe and Bradbury in elementary school, which was always a point of pride for me. (Although it could be hard sometimes to be the “strange kid” in a small town, I still relished my weirdness too.)

As I got older, my love of horror never waned, so I knew I had to become part of the genre in some way. This choice definitely changed my life. I even met my husband back when we were both struggling horror filmmakers. When I finally decided to switch gears and go back to fiction writing, it very much felt that I found my place in the world.    

 

5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

 

I love this question! I’ve never thought about it before, but I guess if I could sit down with anyone from Pretty Marys All in a Row, I would probably go with Rhee (Resurrection Mary). I’ve already spent so much time with her, it seems, because she’s the narrator of the book, so she would be the one that I’d love to meet in person. As for questions, I think I’d just ask her about her day. That probably sounds boring, but I would love to hear the little details about what’s going on with her and how her afterlife is different from everything we as the living would take for granted.    

That being said, if I was just in the mood to hang out, I’d probably choose Lew (Mari Lwyd). She’s so feisty and always has a bottle of booze hidden somewhere, so that would make for a good party anytime!  

 

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

 

I’ve had some good luck with meeting readers and fellow writers on both Twitter and Facebook. There are things I like and dislike about each site, so it probably depends on the day as to which I prefer. Also, if I’m entirely honest, I’m not as social media savvy as a lot of writers. In fact, I’m not very tech savvy at all (I still have a flip phone from circa 2009), but I do my best to muddle through. Even for a Luddite like me, it really is wonderful to be able to connect with others in real-time online, and the friendships I’ve built on social media have definitely helped during the times when writing gets difficult. And at some point, it always seems to get difficult!   

 

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

 

Keep going. Keep honing your craft, and keep learning both what works and what doesn’t work for you in your writing. Not every piece of publishing advice out there is going to be helpful for you, and that’s okay. Figure out what does work, and go with that. Don’t give up, even when it gets hard. Especially when it gets hard. Your voice is needed in this world. Keep going.

 

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

 

I try to keep pretty busy writing—it helps to keep me mostly sane—so I usually have a few things in the works at any given time. Right now, the biggest project on the horizon is my debut novel, The Rust Maidens, which is due out later this year from Trepidatio Publishing, an imprint of JournalStone. The story is set in Cleveland, primarily in the year 1980, and deals with my Rust Belt roots as well as themes I’ve explored in my short fiction: coming of age, body horror, and unlikely friendships.

 

I also have several short stories slated for release this year too, including my horror tale, “An Elegy for Childhood Monsters,” which should be out soon in Grey Matter Press’s Suspended in Dusk 2. That anthology has a table of contents filled with horror authors I greatly admire, and I’m still in awe and shock that I get to be part of that lineup.

 

Finally, my collaborative novella with author Emily B. Cataneo, “In Her Flightless Wings, a Fire,” will be appearing in the forthcoming Chiral Mad 4. So there will definitely be several places to find my work over the next year if you’re so inclined!

In the meantime, you can also find me at my author site (http://www.gwendolynkiste.com/). On my regular blog, I share a monthly roundup of open submission calls and posts about writing tips along with a series of interviews with up-and-coming authors and artists. There’s always so much great stuff going on in the publishing world, so it’s certainly an incredible time to be a writer.

 

And Her Smile Will Untether the Universe

Interview with Author Jennifer Rayes

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?
     I’ve loved to write since an early age. I started with lyrics when I was six then evolved to poems around fourteen. I started a novel when I was sixteen, but never got around to finishing it, and eventually lost the pages (I used to write in a notebook back then). I always enjoyed my English classes in school, and throughout college, I always took Creative Writing as an elective class, even though my Major was Engineering. 
2) What inspired you to write your book?
     I had traveled to Lebanon for winter break, and everyone was raving about this series they were obsessed with on television. As I watched an episode with my family, I thought to myself: I can do this. I want to write a series to keep people entertained.
3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?
     From the synopsis, you can tell the book involves human trafficking. I believe this is a very deep, dark issue that is prevalent in societies all over the world. I wanted to shed light on this issue, but without making the story dark. I try to write the prose in a light manner so that anyone can pick up the book and not struggle with the content.  
4) What drew you into this particular genre?
     I write fiction because I wanted to create a parallel world that functions in almost the same manner as our current one, just in a different setting. I also wanted to mesh kingdoms with modern day issues and technology. My writing is a mix between thriller, action, and mystery, with a touch of romance, to keep things interesting and fast-paced.
5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?
     The character I’d probably sit down with is Barry, even though he is a minor one. He runs the human trafficking establishment that is the setting for the opening chapter. I’d want to ask him how he can sell under-aged girls for sex when he has a family and young children of his own. 
6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?
     Facebook so far. I’ve recently branched into Instagram as well.
7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?
     Don’t give up. I know it sounds cliche, but it’s very easy to just stop writing. Look for the passion behind the words, look for the muse. If you’re having problems with inspiration, read books, talk to people, daydream. And write. Try to write a bit everyday. I find writing to be like working out; when done constantly, it’s easy, if you stop, it’s very hard to get back into.
8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?
     I’ve recently published book 2 in the Intricate Series, and am now working on book 3.
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Interview with Author Mary Hallberg

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

I’ve been writing pretty much every since I knew how. I wrote fan fictions all through junior high and high school, and majored in Creative Writing in college. Even then, I wasn’t sure if I could turn writing into a career, but I’m going to try my hardest.

 

2) What inspired you to write your book?

I never found zombies that scary until I had this dream one night that I was trapped in a little storage room, surrounded by a horde of them. That scene later became a part of STATE OF EMERGENCY. After that dream, I started watching The Walking Dead and thought it would be cool to write a story about teens in the zombie outbreak as it unfolded.

 

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

To be persistent. To trust your gut and take action when you think something is wrong, because it might save you. To not take the people you love for granted, because you never know when they could be gone, and things can change in an instant with no warning.

 

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

I’ve loved horror since I was a kid. I grew up reading Goosebumps and watching ‘Are You Afraid of the Dark?’ on Nickelodeon. As I got older, I graduated to slasher movies and ghost stories. I love the adrenaline rush that horror brings without any of the actual danger.

 

5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

Probably Pierce, just because he has such an interesting backstory. I’d ask him what his family life is like and what he does for enjoyment and escape. Without prying too much, of course.

 

 

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

Probably twitter, since I’ve been on there since long before I started building a writing platform, so I know how to work it pretty well.

 

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Read a lot. Write a lot. Be observant, because you never know when and where inspiration will come. And, above all, don’t give up. If you really have the fire in you to write, you’ll keep doing it no matter how many obstacles get in your way. Because you can’t NOT do it.

 

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

I’ve got a novella coming out later this year, but I’ve changed plans for it about a dozen times already, so I’m not sure of the details. But I will have something out soon, I promise! I have tons of other stories in the pipeline too, and one day I’d love to get an agent. But we’ll see.

 

 

About the Author:

As a child, Mary Hallberg’s mother wanted her to read HEIDI and CADDIE WOODLAWN, so she grew up reading Goosebumps books under the covers. As soon as she was old enough for a Blockbuster card, she graduated to horror classics like Halloween, A Nightmare on Elm Street, and The Evil Dead. Her parents still wonder where they went wrong in raising her. She lives in Mississippi. Visit her online here.

Interview with Author Heather Beal

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

Writing children’s books wasn’t something I thought I would end up doing, but I find now that now that many of my previous life experiences really have helped prepare me to do just that. I retired from a 23-year military career a few years ago where I was very busy with operational planning and targeting. I have pursued and obtained multiple degrees, the latest in emergency management and I run a nonprofit, BLOCKS that helps prepare childcare for disaster.

 

Did you know that children spend an average of 33-35 hours a week in some sort of childcare arrangement? That’s a lot of time away from home. So, the odds of me being lucky enough to be there if something bad happened were pretty low. That thought doesn’t help me sleep at night. So, I started to ask, what could I do to fix that and increase the odds they came home safe?

 

I started looking around at what resources were available and realized there weren’t many available. There were a lot of books about the science behind natural disasters, but nothing written by authors trained in emergency management or designed to help teach kids what do to in the actual disaster itself.

 

2) What inspired you to write your book?

One stormy night I had to try and talk with my daughter (4 at the time) about how we might have to go into the basement later that evening because a tornado watch could turn into a warning. Well, needless to say, I did a really bad job ‘preparing’ her, and instead scared her. I knew that if I could introduce the topics before something happened, it would help her feel like she was more in control and maybe make it less scary. At the time we were watching a lot Daniel Tiger episodes at home, so the idea of combining song and story sort of naturally evolved. That was how I came up the idea of publishing children’s books that teaches preschool kids (through early elementary school) what to do if disaster strikes.  

 

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

I hope that parents and caregivers see the value in teaching their children what to do rather than pretending it won’t happen. We teach our kids about crossing the street, stranger danger, etc. Our children get training on fire drills in daycare or in school, so why not teach them about other disasters? If they know what to do, they can help themselves and others.

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

My daughter is now in Kindergarten and my son is almost three. We read a lot of books at home and they learn a lot from those books as well as what they see and hear. If children learn these lessons now, the lessons become part of their culture. These lessons can become part of their ‘norm’ and can help them throughout their life. Who wouldn’t want to be part of that genre, right?

 

5) If you could sit down with any author in your genre, who would it be, what would you ask them and why?

My early research into this field found Julia Cook. She wrote The Ant Hill Disaster, which deals with finding the strength to return somewhere after something bad has happened. I would ask her how she got her message out. Her books help children deal with emotions and target specific behaviors. Writing the book is the easy part, but finding and building the audience that cares about your message and wants to help endorse it, is the hard part.

 

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

Believe it or not, LinkedIn has been the best readership builder I have had to date. I have been building relationships with childcare providers and emergency managers for years with my nonprofit, and I have found the emergency manager community especially excited to see these books out there.

 

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

Write the books and get them out there. It’s true that the book itself has little value unless people know about it, but don’t let fear of getting the word out prevent you from getting the book out. Look for creative ways to engage people and let them know of what you offer. It’s slow, and its going to be for a while, but you have to look at it like it’s a marathon, not a sprint, or you will get discouraged. When I get discouraged, I remind myself that while we often measure success by the number of books sold, in my case at least, if just one child remembers what to do when a tornado or an earthquake happens, and they are safer because of it, then I am a success. If just one child loves your story and learns something, you too will be a success.

 

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

There are so many issues left to cover. Many disasters are geographically limited. For example, earthquakes are more likely in certain areas, as are volcanoes, but we owe our kids a chance to be prepared no matter what. I am leaning towards hurricane preparedness and flash floods for the next couple of books, but I am going to ask my readers for their thoughts and their priorities – so that may change.

 

Links

Train 4 Safety Press

http://www.train4safety.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Train-4-Safety-Press-243072872831212

Twitter: https://twitter.com/train4_safety