Interview with Author Boris Sanders

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing? 

I started writing when I was about 11. I played with toys a lot (specially legos), and would create stories to play around, and at some point I thought “This story is pretty awesome, I should write them!” and so I did, I pestered my history and literature teacher’s at school to read them too. I’ve gone through these old stories again recently, and let me just tell you this: they seemed much more entertaining when I was 11. I decided to write seriously go back to writing about 3 years ago, when I started writing Code: Revelation, I wrote at a slow pace, I think the only reason I picked pace to write again was knowing my wife was pregnant, it gave me a “it’s now or never” feeling.

2) What inspired you to write your book? 

I wanted to write a story that was different from the rest. I like psychological thrillers since watching Death Note, when it launched, so I decided to venture on this road too. First I created the world, I was trying to imagine a Sci-fi city that was different from all the others portrayed on similar books, after that, the rest came bit by bit. My corporate background certainly played a part on it.

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book? 

That choices have consequences, and regardless of how dire those consequences may be, you must be strong enough to make the choices you believe to be the best. I also like to play a bit around the logic of morals, ethics and law, inviting the reader to reflect about them as well.

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

 I don’t see myself writing anything other than Sci-fi and Fantasy. Almost all the books I’ve read are either Sci-fi or Fantasy, so it’s just natural that I write on these genres. Would I write in another genre? Maybe one day, but surely it would be a challenge.

5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why? 

Without a doubt I would choose Lucy. I mean, she has been around since the dawn of civilization, I would have so many questions that I have a hard time even thinking of where to begin. Maybe start by asking who killed JFK? 

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership? 

Twitter, I still don’t have a big presence there, but it’s growing, and helps me connect with other writers.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there? 

Well, I’m just a starting author myself, should I really be giving advice? haha. I’m not sure if it counts as advice, but I would say to 1- Write a little bit every day. 2- Don’t try to save money, even if it means delaying the book, invest in a good editor. I learned the second one on the hard way.

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon? 

I’m glad you asked, Anthony. My next book, Code: Stasis, is a collection of short stories that, although can be read as a stand-alone, works as a prequel to Code: Revelation. It will feature 4 short stories and a preview of the first 3 chapters of the Code: Revelation. It will be launched on Spring 2019, and it will be completely free on all platforms. I also plan on launching the sequel, Code: Ascension, still on 2019, so I have lots of work to do this year!

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About the Author

Boris Sanders started to write at a very early age, in fact, so much so that, for his mother’s surprise, the doctor who delivered him insisted to have seen some marks that resembled words inside her womb. His intellect is quite advantaged, having learned 37 languages by the age of 14, of which 35 were created by him, don’t have a writing form, and only he can speak and understand them. In addition, he has a photographic memory, as long as an actual photo was taken during the occasion. 

In his spare time Boris likes to swim in waterless pools and investigate the mysteries of the universe, while sitting on his comfortable couch, effectively doing nothing. He has a particular taste for olives of any kind.

Book

Book trailer: https://1drv.ms/v/s!AjZg8_7n9Ym4kqcdOFbQE79fw9ZSRA

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07L3TPH43

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43521844-code

Author

Twitter: https://twitter.com/BorisSanders1

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/boris.sanders/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BorisSandersAuthor

Website: http://www.borissanders.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/18672762.Boris_Sanders

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Interview with Author Rebecca Henry

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. How did you get into writing?

I’m currently living abroad in England with my husband and kids. We absolutely love living in England and have been traveling the world for the past twelve years. I have always been a writer and before I could write words I was pretending to write stories with squiggle markings on paper. I took to poetry at the age of ten, and kept a writing journal in my backpack, which I took everywhere with me. By the time I was nineteen, my poems were published in various school magazines, anthologies, poetry journals, ezines, and websites.

2) What inspired you to write your book?

Louisiana Latte was 100% inspired by my diva sister, Deb, and a business trip we took together to Louisiana. I’ve always been fascinated by Deb’s audacious personality and electric passion for life. It was never a question of if I would write a book inspired by her character, but when.

3) What theme or message do you hope readers will take away from your book?

Firstly, I hope readers get a good laugh from the book. I want to make people laugh and feel good while reading Louisiana Latte – that was my soul intention for writing the book. I purposely made it a quick read, so that it could be light and airy. Something you can pick up while waiting at the doctor’s office, read a chapter, and have a laugh. I feel like the main themes and message in this story is grounded in family (sisters in particular) the bonds we create that last a life time, and the lasting impressions they have on us.

4) What drew you into this particular genre?

Having a diva for a sister! I wanted to embrace the chick-lit genre by incorporating humor, and lots of fun with being a girl! Chick-lit is a great genre and I’m truly excited to have written a book within it.

5) If you could sit down with any character in your book, what would you ask them and why?

If I could sit down and have a conversation with one character from my book I would choose Agatha Broccoli. I would ask her why on earth would she choose to have eyelash implants made from her own human hair.

6) What social media site has been the most helpful in developing your readership?

I actually repel technology and being tech savvy is not my thing. I’m the happiest in the garden or outside on a walk. I do not have any social media sites; however, I appreciate how valuable social media is and I could not have progressed as an author without it. Goodreads and blogs have all been instrumental and invaluable to me. Bloggers, such as yourself, really are the fiber in the thread.

7) What advice would you give to aspiring or just starting authors out there?

My advice to aspiring authors is to stick with it. Just keep writing, keep carrying on and don’t stop until you have your book completed on your computer. I’ve seen aspiring authors begin strong in their book and then drop in the middle. That’s a very dangerous place to stop. You have to keep pushing and keep going. Finish the book!

8) What does the future hold in store for you? Any new books/projects on the horizon?

Yes, I have another book completed, Conjure Lake, which is a fantasy-thriller and I’m working on another novel in the making. I might even like to do a Louisiana Latte 2! The many adventures of Deb continue. Ha-ha.

About the Author

I am a newly published author with one novel released and another book coming out for publication, in February 2019. I am also a world traveller, living abroad. I have many interests and hobbies in life, besides my greatest passion of all, my family. I am also a vegan, gardener, crafter, and I practice yoga regularly.

Guest Blog Post: Do you have to be a nerd to read science fiction? by Author Clive Fleury

What do Leonard diCaprio, Nicolas Cage, Mila Kunis, Megan Fox, and Ben Stiller have in common? Yes, I know they all movie stars but besides that? They are all devotees, lovers of science fiction books and movies, in fact, everything science fiction. And yet none of them lack social skills, and they don’t seem the type to be boringly studious. I wouldn’t describe any of them as losers either. So what the heck are they doing liking sci-fi!

What do Leonard diCaprio, Nicolas Cage, Mila Kunis, Megan Fox, and Ben Stiller have in common? Yes, I know they all movie stars but besides that? They are all devotees, lovers of science fiction books and movies, in fact, everything science fiction. And yet none of them lack social skills, and they don’t seem the type to be boringly studious. I wouldn’t describe any of them as losers either. So what the heck are they doing liking sci-fi!

Some see science fiction and nerds as being like salt and pepper, bacon and eggs, and tables and chairs – twin words that are inseparable. And yet are they? Sure, some nerds like sci-fi. There’s no denying that. But just because some nerds enjoy drinking milk, that doesn’t mean that everyone who drinks milk is a nerd, does it? Of course not… except if you are French! They argue ‘Milk is for babies’. So, if you are not a baby and drink milk they presumably consider you beyond the pale—a nerd in fact. But then doesn’t that say more about France and the French than anything else? After all it’s a nation whose people seem to spend an inordinate amount of time carrying around baguettes, wearing berets, and eating cheese as a desert. Weird!

But back to nerds. And before anyone raises any PC objections let me say straight out—no I don’t have it in for nerds. I could say that ‘some of my best friends are nerds,’ but that would raise all kinds of warning signals. I’ll leave it at: I like nerds. In fact, should some maniac drop a nuclear bomb to wipe out all of humanity, I know nerds would suddenly become everyone’s best friends. Then the ability to ask a girl to dance, or wear skinny jeans wouldn’t be such a high priority. Instead, we’d look to nerds to supply answers to questions like- If most of the world has just become one giant barbecue what do we do next?

Actually, that’s the type of question that’s asked in a few science fiction books, including my own—Kill Code: A Science Fiction Dystopian Novel. (Sorry, I had to get the plugin.) Seeking answers in an entertaining form to these dilemmas is one of the attractions of science fiction. I mean have you ever thought about what life would be like on a neutron star? Well, author Robert Forward did, in his book ‘Dragon’s Egg’ and though Nerdish—Mark 4 on the Nerd scale—it reminds us that life can take many forms. And have you ever considered what it would be like if a pod of whales came to Earth dressed up as people? No? Well, Captain Kirk did in one more bizarre than usual Star Trek episode.  

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And on the subject of things taking different forms, I’ve read that Dr. Jane Goodall, the UN Messenger of Peace, and primatologist, believes ‘The Story of Doctor Dolittle’ and ‘Tarzan of the Apes’ are science fiction novels. Before you shout: ‘But that’s not science fiction,’ maybe you didn’t know many consider the Harry Potter books science fiction too. See, that’s the beauty of the genre, it traverses everything from life on Mars, to a world run by apes and magicians, and everyone has the freedom to define what exactly they think science fiction is.  

But, ‘beauty is in the eye of the beholder,’ and sci-fi is not for everyone. It produces some aggressive reactions. Someone once spat at me that she ‘detested science fiction books,’ and she is not alone. But what can you do with these haters? Burn them at the stake? I don’t think so! For all those who love the genre, don’t even bother to ask the obvious question—have you read any science fiction? You would be wasting your time. Sci-fi is like prunes, Brussels sprouts, and olives—something you either love or loathe.

So what are we to conclude from all this? Some nerds like science fiction books and movies. There’s no denying that. But so to do movie stars, scientists, fashionistas, politicians and on and on—actually a fairly large slice of the world. True, not as many as like romantic novels. Sci-fi books are country cousins to that tribe. But science fiction lovers still occupy a fair swathe of the population, of which nerds are just a sliver. So you definitely need not be a nerd to enjoy sci-fi!

Now that’s settled, please excuse me. I want to get back to reading Selin Ascends by Josiah Bancroft. I’m just getting to an exciting part.

About the Author

Clive Fleury is an award-winning writer of books and screenplays, and a TV and film director and producer.  He has worked for major broadcasters and studios on a wide variety of successful projects in the US, UK, Australia, Europe, and the Middle East. Clive lives in Miami with his wife, his teenage daughter, and a cat called Louis.

© Clive Fleury 2019

Interview with Author Steve Conoboy

1) Tell us a little bit about yourself. What made you want to become an author?

 

There are so many reasons why I ended up here, all weaving together to make the destination inevitable. The very short version is that I was always obsessed with stories. I read every magazine and book I could get hold of from a very early age (I was reading from the TV guide at age 4). I couldn’t get enough of video rentals – all the covers looked incredible. Then I began to record my own voice as I read out all the characters in comic books. Soon I was copying the stories I loved the best: further Star Wars adventures in the form of drawn space battles, writing extra chapters for my favourite fantasy books. Stephen King happened. Then I got hold of a typewriter in my late teens, and I loved the clacky sound it made. After that, I simply wrote for the love of finding out what my crazy characters would get up to next.

 

2) What was the inspiration behind Macadamian Pliers, both the book and the character?

 

It was on a journey home from work, many years ago. The bus passed by a brand new set of apartments, and on the opposite side of the road was a very old building, a real dilapidated hunk of junk. It was obvious which one would be haunted. New buildings are never haunted, unless they’ve been built on top of an old burial ground of some kind. So I wondered, was there any other way to make such a place haunted? The next thought came quickly: was there a way that an estate agent (realtor) could sell a family one of these lovely homes, then render it haunted so that they could chase that family out and sell the house again? The kind of character that would do such a thing would have to be a particularly nasty piece of work… and also a little bit crazy.

I started writing it that night.

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3) What theme or message do you hope readers get from this story?

 

No matter how small you think your voice is, you must always speak out against the darkness.

 

4) If you could have a conversation with any of your characters, who would it be and what would you ask them?

 

Probably Misha from my new release A Graveyard Visible. She’s pretty damn peculiar, so it would be a very interesting conversation. She has a pet mystic 8-ball for a start. It gives her advice. Bad advice.

There’s one other character I’d be interested in talking to, but only over the phone: Macadamian Pliers. I’d love to hear his voice, but I definitely wouldn’t want to be in the same room as him. He just can’t be trusted.

 

5) What social media site has been the most helpful in reaching and conversing with your readership?

 

This is a difficult one, as I’ve got a bit of a rough relationship with social media (bad news for me, considering how all-encompassing such sites are now). Twitter’s been pretty good for picking up leads on review opportunities, and people are very quick to reciprocate any kindness – but tweets go by in a flash, and if you don’t keep up constant engagement, it’s all for nothing. Facebook is good for giving out more information, as well as finding decent groups, but my reach there is limited and advertising does very, very little. Also, I feel Facebook has no interest in supporting its users if they have any significant issues as a result of the site and its other users, and therefore resent being on it at all. I kind-of feel like that about all social media, really – I think they’ve encouraged a deep-rooted seam of unpleasantness to bubble up from the masses, and people can be so vile.

I actually find that being on other people’s book blogs and websites is most useful. If anyone is visiting those sites, they have done so for a reason. Far fewer people, maybe, but at least it’s your target audience.

 

6) What matters more to you when writing: developing plot or creating characters?

 

Characters must always come first. No doubt. Anyone who says different is wrong. All story must be driven by the characters actions (or inaction). If plot comes first, then you’re forcing your characters to do things that they definitely wouldn’t do, and readers will pick up on that in a heartbeat.

 

7) What advice would you give to up and coming authors?

 

Do it for the love. Really, that’s the most important part of the whole process. If you’re enjoying what you’re writing, then there’s a chance that someone else will enjoy reading it. If it feels like a slog, something’s wrong. I’ve dumped a couple of novels partway through the writing process because they felt so off.

 

8) What’s next for you in the world of writing? Any new or upcoming books on the horizon?

 

I’m currently gearing up for the release of A Graveyard Visible on 27th April 2018, so there’s a lot of promotion work and pulling together some reviews (which are proving to be very divisive so far – that’s either incredibly worrying or a great marketing tool). It’s being published by Lodestone Books, and the cover and the layout of the paperback look absolutely fantastic, so pleased with the result. On the writing side of things, I’m playing about with a possible tone change for an AGV sequel, as well as being deep into the writing of a story about the political activism of a pig. Yeah, it’s something a little bit different.

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