Give Me Shelter by David B. Seaburn Review 

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. All opinions are my own.

Two boys grieving the loss of their parents nine years earlier venture into their own futures amidst the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis in author David b. Seaburn’s “Give Me Shelter”.

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The Synopsis

The dual challenges of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis that threatens the world and the unexplained loss of parents that threatens a family are the driving forces behind the lives of two boys and their grandfather.

Willie, Denny and their grandfather, Pop, have lived together for nine years, ever since the boys’ parents died in an accident that remains a mystery to the boys. Denny reluctantly leaves for college, while Willie enters sixth grade, fearful of the menacing missile crisis and curious about his parents’ fate.

Willie’s best friends are Lucy and Preston. Lucy wonders about the ‘man in the suit’ who seems to be everywhere she goes. Her mom, Trish, grapples with unemployment. Preston is burdened by the trauma his father is experiencing due to his military service. Denny meets his first-ever girlfriend at college, Lucy, who has one leg that’s shorter than the other. Good neighbor, Robert, is building a bomb shelter in the back yard. Muriel, his mother is a shoot-from-the-hip older adult with dementia.

Over time, the connections between them create the shelter they need for their common journey. Seaburn again tells a story of human vulnerability, endurance, secrets, truth, loss, humor, resilience and love.

The Review

The author has done an incredible job once again finding just the right balance between the genre of the novel and the emotional weight of the character’s journey. The historical fiction aspect of this novel showcasing the tense atmosphere of the missile crisis was brought to life perfectly on the page, showcasing the heart-pounding fear and paranoia that so many were forced to live in on a daily basis for so long. The intimate look into these characters’ lives and how their past and present circumstances are impacted by this crisis was amazing to get lost in.

The emotional character development and vivid imagery the author used to bring these settings to life made the story soar. The realism that the author utilizes in their writing style and narrative not only adds relatability to the story but kept readers invested in these character’s lives as they dealt with everything from loss and grief to caring for a parent in their elderly years and living in a state of fear and trying to find the hope to combat that fear. 

The Verdict

Heartfelt, captivating, and engaging, author David B. Seaburn’s “Give Me Shelter” is a must-read historical fiction meets drama novel. The imagery almost reminded me of the nostalgia and style of Blast From the Past with a more mysterious and intriguing tone to the narrative, and the realism of the characters and their individual plights will help readers feel more invested as the story winds down. If you haven’t yet, be sure to grab your copy today!

Rating: 10/10

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About the Author

David B. Seaburn’s first novel, Darkness is as Light, was published in 2005. He followed with Pumpkin Hill (2007), Charlie No Face (2011), a Finalist for the National Indie Excellence Award in General Fiction, Chimney Bluffs (2012), More More Time (2015), and Parrot Talk (2017), which placed second in the 2017 TAZ Awards for Fiction and was short-listed for the 2018 Somerset Award. Gavin Goode (2019) was an American Book Fest Finalist for Best Book in General Fiction and Semi-finalist in Literary, Contemporary and Satire Fiction for the Somerset Award. His latest novel is Broken Pieces of God (2021).Seaburn and his wife live in western New York. They have two married daughters and four fabulous grandchildren.

www.davidbseaburn.com

www.amazon.com/author/davidbseaburn

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/going-out-not-knowing

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